Letter to the Editor – Friday, January, 27, 2023

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Letter to the Editor – Friday, January, 27, 2023

Baby Bula Boys go down

OUR Baby Bula Boys played their hearts out against the Junior All Whites.

The same trend was repeated again this year with our under-17 team defeating teams with a margin of three goals to nil in most games. But when it really mattered, the Baby Bula Boys were defeated as predicted by many soccer followers by the Junior All Whites.

Lately, Fiji only played matches against island teams.

These island teams were defeated by Fiji previously but lately things have changed.

Fiji started losing to Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and PNG in the Oceania league and national level.

While many smaller island teams have improved their soccer standard, I believe Fiji is going backwards. I would say the politics in Fiji soccer is dragging the team backwards.

Goefferey Chand, Lautoka

Leftover food

TONNES of leftover food from resorts, hotels, restaurants and all eateries should no longer be thrown away.

They should be properly disposed of for composting and used by younger up-and-coming “greener fingers” as they venture into agriculture. The flower business is a big growing money spinner.

Compost will produce huge financial benefits. Food for thought by all concerned. Your caring Nadi-based retiree offers some advice free-of-charge. Will this suggestion work? Will our professional waste re-cyclers consider this option too? Fiji faces a new dawn under our coalition Government.

Here’s a thought from “outside the box”.

RONNIE CHANG Martintar, Nadi

Traffic flow

NADI Town’s traffic layout, which a couple of years back was altered to make things better in terms of traffic flow, is not working and I think we need to re-look at it and see what better arrangement could be brought about in making our commuting more comfortable.

I believe any alteration will not work unless more routes are opened that can share the load thus allowing traffic to move more freely and smoothly at the same time. We should always keep trying to make our tourist town more attractive and user friendly if you like.

A town’s traffic woes and its failing infrastructure will obviously prove counterproductive which no town administration should avoid looking at. In order to maintain the town’s image and attraction as a tourist destination, you need to start addressing and eliminating the negativity while improving and modernising the facilities of the town at the same time.

I speak because I want our town to become one of the finest in the region. I will keep suggesting things that I think need your attention.

Thank you.

SURESH CHAND Nadi

Water issues

I JUST couldn’t stop laughing last night when I read a concern of the former minister for infrastructure stating, “No water for two days” posted on his political campaign page on Facebook.

I wonder if Mr Usamate would take a moment to reflect on his ministerial leadership as to why didn’t he fix the water problem when he was the minister responsible. Families and friends living in Nakasi, Tacirua and Howell Rd have also raised issues of frequent water cuts.

Anyway, I believe the continuous issue of intermittent water supply to various communities around the greater Suva and Nasinu area is a clear example of poor infrastructure planning and management.

This constant intermittent water supply that has affected communities all over for over a decade has to be a priority of the coalition Government, period. We can only hope that Honourable Ro Filipe Tuisawau and the coalition Government will find solutions so that members of the public are not constantly deprived of this basic human necessity.

AREKI DAWAI Suva

Old Rewa bridge

THE old Rewa bridge was officially commissioned on June 12, 1937.

It is now over 85 years old and has served its purpose silently until the new European Union-funded Rewa Bridge came to existence. On June 30, 2017, the Fiji Roads Authority decided to close it down as it saw fit.

And today, it is still standing but structurally deteriorating for the past six years.

There has been news for its removal and yet nothing has ever materialised officially.

Do we have to wait until it suddenly collapses? In fact, chunks of concrete, etc, have been sighted tearing off from the structure.

SAMU SILATOLU Nakasi, Nausori

Commission

APART from the A-G, I was wondering who the rest of the members of the Mercy Commission are.

I cannot recall their names being announced. I am confident that just like the Speaker of Parliament and recent appointments to the civil service, statutory boards and diplomatic missions, those appointed to the Mercy Commission are all independent, transparent, unbiased and above board.

The Government must maintain its clean record.

JAN NISSAR NSW, Australia

Let them be

THE people of Fiji will resolve their own problems.

They have changed the government and are currently basking in their new found freedom.

Let them be.

DAN URAI Lautoka

Fishing licence

WHY does the registration number of a local fishing boat has to change year in year out?

The inconvenience the owners have to go through.

Pay fees for licence.

Then pay to repaint new registration number.

Then wait for fisheries staff members to inspect the said change at a time convenient to them.

What are the fishermen to do during the wait.

Wash cars?

MANOJ LAL PATEL Lautoka

Greatest honour

THE greatest honour there is, is the ability to take good care and assist, those who once did that lovingly for us.

We unfortunately often forget and even carelessly neglect, that our parents and our elders, had sacrificed their own lives, resources and their time, to nurture, educate and protect us, as well as to instill within us, valuable life skills and lessons, so as to withstand the pressures, of daily living.

EDWARD BLAKELOCK Pacific Harbour

PM is right

PM terminates MOU (FT 26/1) between Fiji Police Force and China’s Ministry of Public Security.

Good on PM Rabuka to do that.

That MOU demonstrates just how far we as a nation had strayed from the norms of democratic governance by embracing a partnering arrangement with a totalitarian regime.

The PM is right “our system of democracy and justice are (indeed) different so we will go back to those that have a similar system with us”.

We should not have gone down that path in the first place.

I applaud the PM for taking corrective action.

RAJEND NAIDU Sydney, Australia

Price of fish

HOW is, the manner in which you wash cars, got to do with the price of fish?

MANOJ LAL PATEL Lautoka

A brave man

ALLEN Lockington’s daughter, Manavesi Lockington, who was very close to him said her father was very brave to be able to see the pain so many needy families went through and not let it take away his joy.

(FT 26/01) She said they came to know about the extent of people’s suffering during the pandemic when her dad came home and shared with them the heart-breaking stories.

She said her dad did his best to help needy families and that he was strong and joyful. Allen will be laid to rest tomorrow and I expect a huge crowd at the Girmit Centre in Lautoka to pay their respects to a writer, humanitarian, fun-loving and social worker who has left behind a legacy of his own.

Tributes and condolences continue to pour on social and print media and these are evidence of how great Allen was. I’m sure the Lockington family has realised the impact their beloved member had on ordinary Fijians, The Fiji Times and the country at large.

Dearest Manavesi, just as your house feels so empty without dad, this column feels so empty without the witty contributions from the writer who made the Sugar City proud!

Thank you to The Fiji Times for the fitting obituary on Allen!

Thank you so much dear writers for the wonderful and heart-touching letters in honour of Allen.

RAJNESH ISHWAR LINGAM Nadawa, Nasinu

Rest in peace

I AM a new writer in The Fiji Times and it has been an honour for me to read all the letters that were written by the famous letter writer, Allen Lockington, from whom I got my inspiration and whose letters I enjoyed reading.

His letters had such deep meanings and ideas that motivated me to keep writing and share my thoughts with the public and the way he has contributed to the community has melted everyone’s hearts.

I may not know him from a long time but I do know what kind of man he was and how much he had done for the country.

I send my regards to his family and friends and I send my farewell to the writer himself.

Rest in peace, sir! Your good deeds will be remembered forever.

KELEPI DAKUIYACO Waikalou, Serua

Allen’s legacy

I AGREE with everything Rajnesh Ishwar Lingam says in his tribute to Allen Lockington ( FT 26/1), except where he describes him as “powerful Allen”.

Allen was neither a powerful man nor a man interested in power.

Like The Fiji Times editorial so succinctly states, Allen was “an ordinary man”.

What was powerful was his love and care and compassion for his fellow Fijians who were poor and disadvantaged.

That is what set him apart from powerful politicians who often failed to do the right thing by this section of society.

Rajeshwar acknowledges this difference between Allen and the “talking politicians” (term from the lyrics of the Yothu Yindi song Treaty).

RAJEND NAIDU Sydney, Australia

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